some_text some_text
sum new stuff for my website

sum new stuff for my website

(Source: girlification, via )

This was posted 2 weeks ago. It has 29 notes. .

Purchased Embodiments 
(imagery posted above)

This was posted 2 weeks ago. It has 1 note. Played 34 times.
This was posted 2 weeks ago. It has 8 notes. .
S/S14

S/S14

This was posted 1 month ago. It has 14 notes. .
"Womanliness can be assumed and worn as a mask" exhibiting this piece @ Rundgang, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. Opening today. 

"Womanliness can be assumed and worn as a mask" exhibiting this piece @ Rundgang, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts. Opening today. 

This was posted 1 month ago. It has 86 notes. .

dramaisthenewblack:

Rihanna at CFDA Awards 2014

(via sus-dad)

This was posted 1 month ago. It has 244,977 notes.
This was posted 1 month ago. It has 3 notes.

My version of a appropriate weather reporting 

This was posted 1 month ago. It has 59 notes.
"The image on the left displays a man holding out a closed jewelry box to a woman with her legs crossed. The image on the right shows the man holding an open jewelry box with a diamond inside of it. In this second image, the woman’s legs are uncrossed, and open. Her body language is submissive. Although the man’s body isn’t even shown, the viewer can still sense that the man is dominant over the woman in the second image. Even though the advertisement should be focused on the actual diamond, the diamond in the picture is barely visible. Instead the focus is placed on the portrayal of the woman as a sex object for the man. The woman’s legs are pale and flawless, which suggests that she is pure and virginal. The ad suggests that the woman will sacrifice her purity not for the man himself, but for material objects such as diamonds, in this case. In Hesse-Biber’s “The Cult of Thinness,” she argues on page 62 that “Our society encourages women to see themselves as objects.” In Chapter 3, “Selling the Body Beautiful: Food, Dieting, and Recovery,” she discusses how the beauty industry succeeds by nurturing female insecurities. She explains how the mirror, which reflects objects placed before it, is an analogy for how our society lives off of women’s addiction to weight and body image. This ad makes a direct comparison between a woman and a diamond. The woman’s flawless skin and legs match up to the flawlessness of the diamond. The ad suggests that the beauty of women should be equivalent to the beauty of a diamond, an object that is cut, carved, and manipulated until perfectly beautiful."

"The image on the left displays a man holding out a closed jewelry box to a woman with her legs crossed. The image on the right shows the man holding an open jewelry box with a diamond inside of it. In this second image, the woman’s legs are uncrossed, and open. Her body language is submissive. Although the man’s body isn’t even shown, the viewer can still sense that the man is dominant over the woman in the second image. Even though the advertisement should be focused on the actual diamond, the diamond in the picture is barely visible. Instead the focus is placed on the portrayal of the woman as a sex object for the man. The woman’s legs are pale and flawless, which suggests that she is pure and virginal. The ad suggests that the woman will sacrifice her purity not for the man himself, but for material objects such as diamonds, in this case. In Hesse-Biber’s “The Cult of Thinness,” she argues on page 62 that “Our society encourages women to see themselves as objects.” In Chapter 3, “Selling the Body Beautiful: Food, Dieting, and Recovery,” she discusses how the beauty industry succeeds by nurturing female insecurities. She explains how the mirror, which reflects objects placed before it, is an analogy for how our society lives off of women’s addiction to weight and body image. This ad makes a direct comparison between a woman and a diamond. The woman’s flawless skin and legs match up to the flawlessness of the diamond. The ad suggests that the beauty of women should be equivalent to the beauty of a diamond, an object that is cut, carved, and manipulated until perfectly beautiful."

This was posted 2 months ago. It has 9 notes. .

gendered objects/female coded objects

This was posted 2 months ago. It has 5 notes.
me and arvida are working on some png’s from the show that will soon!!! to be showcased on art baby gallery 

me and arvida are working on some png’s from the show that will soon!!! to be showcased on art baby gallery 

This was posted 2 months ago. It has 74 notes. .
This was posted 3 months ago. It has 7 notes.
" I look for cute, funny, clever - what I look for in GIFS, I look for in love interests!" Me and Arvida chatting 4 Kopenhagen Art Magazine about our show LIKE

" I look for cute, funny, clever - what I look for in GIFS, I look for in love interests!" 
Me and Arvida chatting 4 Kopenhagen Art Magazine about our show LIKE

This was posted 3 months ago. It has 1,553 notes. .
"Like, u know. The word like is like, seen as something redundant, like the way female coded objects are like, u know, well, the colour pink or u wearing lipstick is seen as something unnecessary, but like, for some people it’s still like pretty enjoyable and it’s not like it’s hurting anyone else really. And then like, the verb ‘to like’ something online is like, you know, when ur getting that ‘like’, you know what ur social value is in a money-driven society. But like at the same time it’s like based on something pretty positive and like actually some kind of support when like, u know u r liking someone’s selfie. U know, if we like think about ‘liking’ in relationship to selfie haters, well it might not be sellable to like hate on selfies but like, it’s pretty mean. But like yeah.”
Vernissage - Fri 18th April @18.00 - 22.00 (Skype Session @20.00)Gallery will be open between sat 19th - mon 21st April @12.00-18.00 
LIKE is curated by Maja Malou Lyse and Arvida Bystöm

"Like, u know. The word like is like, seen as something redundant, like the way female coded objects are like, u know, well, the colour pink or u wearing lipstick is seen as something unnecessary, but like, for some people it’s still like pretty enjoyable and it’s not like it’s hurting anyone else really. 
And then like, the verb ‘to like’ something online is like, you know, when ur getting that ‘like’, you know what ur social value is in a money-driven society. But like at the same time it’s like based on something pretty positive and like actually some kind of support when like, u know u r liking someone’s selfie. U know, if we like think about ‘liking’ in relationship to selfie haters, well it might not be sellable to like hate on selfies but like, it’s pretty mean. But like yeah.”

Vernissage - Fri 18th April @18.00 - 22.00 (Skype Session @20.00)
Gallery will be open between sat 19th - mon 21st April @12.00-18.00
 

LIKE is curated by Maja Malou Lyse and Arvida Bystöm

This was posted 3 months ago. It has 45 notes. .

(via maygrey)

This was posted 3 months ago. It has 323 notes. .